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Times tables and division facts (Year 2)

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This week we’re focusing on applying our knowledge of the 2, 5 and 10 times table and their corresponding division facts, otherwise known as the inverse

Multiplication and division are inverse operations. This means they are the opposite of each other. By knowing the answer to one of the number sentences means you can work out all the others. 

2 x 5 = ?

5 x 2 = ?

10 ÷ 5 = ?

10 ÷ 2 = ?

We can use a diagram to represent all 4 number sentences or mathematical statements. 

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Look at the diagram above, it represents 2 groups of 5 ice creams which equals 10 ice creams in total as well as 10 ice creams shared equally between 2 people. 

It also represents 5 groups of 2 ice creams which equals 10 ice creams in total as well as 10 ice creams shared equally between 5 people. 

Now we know that division is the inverse of multiplication and multiplication is the inverse of division. 

Challenge 1

Miss Coverdale collects 10ps. She has collected 90p in total.

How many 10p pieces does she have?

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  • The calculation that represents this situation is 90 ÷ 10 = ?.

  • Remember, division is the inverse of multiplication so it is possible to work out the answer by using the equivalent times table; for example, 10 × ? = 90.

  • To help you work it out, think about how many groups of 10 you need to make 90.

  • Use your knowledge of the 10 times table to work out. You can count in 10s until you get to 90 or use repeated addition to help you.

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Challenge 2

There are 45 chairs. They get stacked in piles of 5.

How many stacks of chairs will there be when all the chairs have been tidied away?

  • We can use the calculation 45 ÷ 5 = ? to represent this problem. 
  • To help you work it out, think about how many groups of 5 you need to make 45.

Challenge 3

There are 18 books. Each child gets 2 books each to take home for the holidays.

How many children can be given their books?

  • What calculation could we use to represent this problem?
  • When you’ve worked out the calculation, think about which times table you will need to use to help you find the answer. 
  • Remember, you can use skip counting or repeated addition to help you.

Challenge 4

Look at the array below. You may want to draw it out yourself and use different colours to show the groups and number in each group. 

  • Using your knowledge of the 2 times table, what 4 calculations could this array represent?
  • Now you have all 4 calculations, can you create your own multiplication or division problem to match the array?

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